3. Writing only about writing would be boring AF.

“…only a few words today, and indeed with pencil…” – The Beethoven Letters

Why don’t you blog on the writing process more? I thought you were a writer?

I have not been bombarded with the question (openly) but I feel the lurkings of the unspoken inquiry surrounding nearly every blog I post.

Yes, I am a writer. The difference between a writer and an author is publication. Duration and quality as quantifiers for being labeled a writer are subjective.  There are published works in current circulation that cause you to smack your palm to your forehead and wonder, ‘HOW? HOW IS THIS PERSON AN AUTHOR? HOW HAS THIS PERSON BEEN PUBLISHED?’

On the flip side of publication disbelief, there have been and will continue to be those novels that are considered literary masterpieces, turned down by countless agents and publishers decades before. That’s why time and style are subjective qualifiers for being considered a writer. Therefore, one is either a published author or a writer. Because I actively write, and am not yet published, I am a writer.

Yes, the overarching theme to this blog is dedicated to discussing writing, the experiences (professional and unprofessional), the processes and more. I have and I will continue to do so, but…

1. At the end of the day, this blog benefits me so long as I am practicing my writing skills. That being the case, I’ll write whatever I want.

2. This blog is also essentially a tool. As I discussed in, I believe, my second blog ever written, social media is the new platform for writers to get recognition. I cannot tell you how much I deplore that fact as the attention should immediately go to the work I’m submitting and not my online persona, (which could be complete and utter bullshit wherein I say just about anything to get a lit agent’s attention) but whatever. Blogging and the like has become the norm for would-be authors so I play along.

3. Writing only about writing would be boring AF.

4. Those of you who know me personally know I’ve had to put my work on the back-burner. When I was actively working on my novel, my then 3-year old, E, was still taking naps. She doesn’t take naps anymore. I also used to place my toddler in part-time daycare. Between naps and part-time care, I got roughly 8-10 weeks of uninterrupted time to write. Man – those were the days. Beginning in August, my daughter’s preschool will cost us a little over $600 a month. I made the decision to stop using daycare, even part-time, for reasons of obvious financial sanity.

All that said, I have made no current endeavors to give my novel the overhaul it needs. The inquiries too. I need time, I need quiet, and right now, I have neither. With preschool comes delicious, gorgeous freedom. Until then, I consider myself fortunate to knock out a blog or two during the week.

As we speak, E’s toys occasionally streak past me as I’m doing my level best to get this blog out-the-door, and hopefully written in a way that’s considered passable in the English language.

“You can read anywhere, almost, but when it comes to writing…most of us need a place of our own…and it really only needs one thing: a door you are willing to shut. The closed door is your way of telling the world and yourself that you mean business.” – Stephen King

ArmedWithCoffee.com
Austin, Texas
@gnrmuggle

One thought on “3. Writing only about writing would be boring AF.

  1. Thanks all, who have quietly (meaning politely) pointed out grammatical errors. As I’ve said before, sometimes it’s all I can do to get these out-the-door. A second pair of eyes, or a few dozen, always helps.

    Like

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